search library

Search the IAOMT Library

for full documentation of all matters of biological dentistry

Truvia® – Safe for humans but not fruit flies?

35886504_sErythritol, a Non-Nutritive Sugar Alcohol Sweetener and the Main Component of Truvia®, Is a Palatable Ingested Insecticide

 

Abstract

Insecticides have a variety of commercial applications including urban pest control, agricultural use to increase crop yields, and prevention of proliferation of insect-borne diseases. Many pesticides in current use are synthetic molecules such as organochlorine and organophosphate compounds. Some synthetic insecticides suffer drawbacks including high production costs, concern over environmental sustainability, harmful effects on human health, targeting non-intended insect species, and the evolution of resistance among insect populations. Thus, there is a large worldwide need and demand for environmentally safe and effective insecticides. Here we show that Erythritol, a non-nutritive sugar alcohol, was toxic to the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Ingested erythritol decreased fruit fly longevity in a dose-dependent manner, and erythritol was ingested by flies that had free access to control (sucrose) foods in choice and CAFE studies. Erythritol was US FDA approved in 2001 and is used as a food additive in the United States. Our results demonstrate, for the first time, that erythritol may be used as a novel, environmentally sustainable and human safe approach for insect pest control.

flies

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

———————————————————————————————————————————————

from Natural News, June 29, 2015

Truvia Sweetener A Powerful Pesticide; Scientist Shocked As Fruit Flies Die In Less Than A Week Eating GMO-Derived Erythritol

Truvia sweetener is made from about 99.5% erythritol (a sugar alcohol), and 0.5% rebiana, an extract from the stevia plant (but not at all the same thing as stevia). A shocking new study published in the journal PLOS ONE has found that Truvia, an alternative sweetener manufactured by food giant Cargill, is apotent insecticide that kills fruit flies which consume it.
The study is titled, Erythritol, a Non-Nutritive Sugar Alcohol Sweetener and the Main Component of Truvia, Is a Palatable Ingested Insecticide.
The study found that while fruit flies normally live between 39 and 51 days, those that ate the Truvia ingredient erythritol died in less than a week.
Erythritol made from yeast fed genetically modified corn derivatives
Erythritol is often indirectly derived from genetically modified corn, by the way. Cargill was forced to settle a class action lawsuit last year for labeling Truvia “natural” when it’s actually made from a fermentation process whereby yeast are fed GM corn maltodextrin.
Cargill plays word games with this process, insisting that “erythritol is not derived from corn or dextrose feedstock; it is derived from the yeast organism.”
Yeah, okay, but the yeast are fed GMOs. So they’re playing mind games with their explanations.
There is a verified non-GMO erythritol available today, by the way, and it’s made by Pyure Brands, based in Florida.
Pyure Brands offers alternative sweeteners for the health-conscious marketplace, and their product is USDA Organic certified and Non-GMO Project Verified.
Truvia a really amazing insecticide
This story on Truvia’s insecticidal properties has really caught the attention of the public. Even CBS News, a mainstream media outlet that rarely covers the dangers of food additives, covered this story, reporting:
Erythritol, the main component of the sweetener Truvia, has a new, unexpected application — it may be used as an insecticide. …Researchers found that fruit flies fed with food that included erythritol or the erythritol-containing sweetener Truvia died much sooner than flies fed with food containing other types of sweeteners.
“The more you get [fruit flies] to consume erythritol, the faster they die,” Sean O’Donnell, a professor of biology at Drexel University in Philadelphia, told CBS News.
“We are hoping to develop it into a human-safe insecticide,” O’Donnell later says in the story.

Read the whole article.